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"Daddy, what was real life like?" is the title of Thomas Webb's (b. Ashford, UK, 1991) first Italian solo exhibition, through which the artist shares his vision of the future. The question that gives the title to the exhibition is the one that the artist imagines one day future generations, completely immersed in technology and virtual reality, will ask their parents. 

Following his vision of a world in which physical and digital realities will be increasingly connected, Webb has produced his new series of digital mirrors and "infinity mirrors" some of which are capable of collecting data and updating themselves automatically continuously. Webb's interactive artworks allow the viewer to be catapulted into a futuristic dimension, making them the main subject of the artwork. These works randomly display various contrasting visions on a multitude of themes, allowing viewers to choose a version that best reflects their current opinion or mood and capture it before is gone, forcing us to reflect on the influence new media and technology have put us under. 

These very advancements, having on the one hand allowed us to be more connected, accepted and open are simultaneously making us more alienated, insecure and anxious. Ultimately, the artist's work aims to make the viewer question his or her actual freedom of choice and thought in a world controlled by the media and corporations.

Thomas Webb

Emoglyphics  , 2021

Aluminum, glass, and LED

81 x 42,5 x 28 cm

Price: 9.000 euro

An artwork can tell a thousand words. Here Webb is exploring how emojis are used to communicate more than just words. They have become modern-day hieroglyphics

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INSTALL PICS:

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ARTWORKS:

Thomas Webb

Pillar of autumn, 2021

Aluminum, glass, and LED

42,5 x 42,5 x 18 cm

Recreating the falling leaves, Webb comments on climate change with a clock, counting down until the depletion of the Amazon rainforest. 

Thomas Webb

Emoglyphics  , 2021

Aluminum, glass, and LED

81 x 42,5 x 28 cm

An artwork can tell a thousand words. Here Webb is exploring how emojis are used to communicate more than just words. They have become modern-day hieroglyphics

Thomas Webb

Just Keep Swimming, 2021

Aluminum, glass, and LED

61,5 x 61,5 x 38 cm

The mentality to keep going is, in Webb’s view, ingrained into us as a species. Our desire to procreate and inevitably die fuels the cycle of life. Here Webb has created an endlessly looping simulation of fish inside a tank-like coffee table as a constant reminder that the cycle not only repeats itself but is in someways, nihilistic. 

Thomas Webb

Mood Mirror, 2021

Aluminum, glass, and LED

112 x 62 x 7 cm

Thomas Webb

Circadian Capital, 2021

Aluminum, glass, and LED

112 x 81 x 7 cm

As Webb sees it, our biological existences have been appropriated in the interest of capital accumulation.

Capitals circadian humorizes the modern daily routine.

Thomas Webb

Genesis Documentation, 2021

Aluminum and LED

157,5 x 104,5 x 7 cm

Here Webb questions the simulation theory, rewriting the bible genesis story as a computer program, changing the words god and heaven for the programmer and the cloud.

Thomas Webb

Corporate Control, 2021

Aluminum, mirror, and LED

175 x 100 x 7 cm

With this work, Webb explores the morality of the goods and services we acquire from corporations. How do they affect society and at what cost? Giving the viewer the choice to the device from his perspectives,  polar opposite opinions on the themes. 

Thomas Webb

All the data in the world and I still don’t know how you feel, 2021

Aluminum, mirror, and LED

175 x 100 x 7 cm

Webb explores the uncertainty of digital communication. Our ever-expanding digital vocabulary presents uncertain emotional responses to communications, boundaries, and agency over our digital self. Here Webb allows the viewer to express their view through the ever changing algorithm of the artwork.